Timeline for Hatshepsut

 adapted from lecture & notes by Gae Callender

Macquarie University 2002

 

Hatshepsut did not leave many dates on her monuments, so the timeline is small.

 

The dates are given in  “Years”, the normal way a ruler provided dates in his or her reign. 

Note that Hatshepsut dated her reign from the time that Thutmose III came to the throne.

 

 

Year

Events 

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Thut III

1

Thutmose III is crowned, and Queen Hatshepsut is appointed as regent for the young king. It is usual for the widow of the previous king to act as regent if a king were under age. Thutmose III is known to have been "a hawk [still] in the nest" at accession.

2-7

As regent, Hatshepsut orders Senenmut to go to Aswan, and cut two obelisks from the red Aswan granite. Obelisks are monuments for the sun god. Amen's name had been tied to the name of the sun god, Re, to increase his popularity. These two obelisks stood on each side of an altar to the sun disc, Re-Horakhte. It was the earliest known open air altar to this god that is known. Hatshepsut erected another altar to Re-Horakhte in the Sun Court, on the upper terrace of her temple in Deir el Bahri.

2-7

 

At some stage during this time, Hatshepsut is crowned as pharaoh. The monarchy becomes a coregency with Thutmose III. Year 7 is the most likely date (see below).

 

Year 7 is the most likely date for Hatshepsut's transition from 

Regent (Queen Regnant) to Co-Regent (pharaoh) 

 

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with 

Thut III

 

 

7

This is the earliest date recorded with Hatshepsut’s title as pharaoh. She may have used it earlier, but no dated record of this has yet been found. The earliest dates appear among the burial equipment of Senemnut’s mother, Hatnofer. Some of her equipment also held the title of Hatshepsut as God’s Wife of Amen, a title she dropped when she became a ruler. (Her daughter, Neferure, then took on those duties as High Priestess to the god Amen.)

In this same year she abandons her first tomb, which was situated among the tombs of other royal women in a lonely wadi behind the cliffs of Deir el Bahari, and orders work to begin on a new tomb for herself in the Valley of the Kings. New stage in work at Djeser Djeseru.

9

Hatshepsut sends a large expedition to Punt, a country that is likely to be Somaliland, on the Horn of Africa. Very few kings ever sent their ships to Punt. Most of the trade from that place came down to the River Nile, in Nubia (not far from Khartoum today). No Egyptian expedition had been sent to Punt for about 500 years prior to Hatshepsut, so there was great excitement in the land over this trading venture.

The expedition was led by Nehesy, a foreigner; his name means "the Nubian". He was Chancellor (Seal-bearer) of Upper Egypt, and had been given the title of "prince" - although he was not a member of the royal family. (A large number of important officials were given this title.) Nehesy appears at Deir el Bahri in part of the wall scene showing the voyage to Punt.

13

Hatshepsut sends an expedition to the turquoise mines in the Sinai. These mines had not been visited by official expeditions for over 100 years, because the area was dangerous (tribes of Bedouin would attack foreigners who went there). 

16 

This is the year of Hatshepsut's heb-sed (or rejuvenation festival). She sends her official, Amenhotep, to cut out two obelisks from the granite rocks on the  island of  Seheil, near   Aswan. The obelisks are to celebrate her heb-sed. The obelisks were then erected in  Karnak after they had been coated with electrum (a mixture of silver and gold), so that they. would shine in the sun. 

In this same year Hatshepsut  starts work on her famous Red Chapel at  Karnak. Like all Egyptian sacred buildings, it had a name: The Place of the Heart of Amen. This building was a shrine for the processional boat of the god, Amen. (The statues of the various gods were taken around the temple in a barque, or boat, and the Red Chapel was a god's barque chapel where the boat rested when it wasn't being used.) The Red Chapel was made of pink-red Aswan granite. It had scenes from Hatshepsut's heb-sed carved on it.

In the same year Hatshepsut sends an expedition to Wadi Maghara, in the Sinai. The workers there cut a temple to Hathor out of the rock.

18

Hatshepsut orders a huge pylon (or gateway), to be made beside the sacred lake at the Temple of Amun at Karnak. This is the temple's eighth pylon.

This gateway is different from all the others that had been built, for it is put on a different pathway. The path leads to a  temple  Hatshepsut had begun: the   Temple of  Mut

20

Another expedition is sent to the turquoise mines in the Sinai. A number of expeditions had been sent during Hatshepsut's reign, but only two expedition leaders left records with dates on them

21

(Manetho an Egyptian historian) tells us that Hatshepsut died in this year. Two different dates have been recorded in copies of Manetho's work, but the ninth month of this year is more likely to have been the date of her death.